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Press Release

Imaging Study Expands Upon Previous Findings that Cefaly® Device Is Effective in Blocking Migraine Pain

CEFALY Technology
Posted on: 25 Jul 17

PR Newswire

NEW YORK, July 25, 2017

NEW YORK, July 25, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- A new functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study expands upon previous findings that migraine medical device, Cefaly, successfully affects the metabolic activity in the areas of the brain affected among migraine patients. The new findings mark the third time in less than two months that a different form of imaging reveals similar data.

"The accumulation and the consistency of these three published clinical trials demonstrate the efficacy of Cefaly, particularly among the most severe migraine patients," said Dr. Pierre Rigaux, chief executive officer of CEFALY Technology, the maker of the device. "We are very pleased to see publications that document the mechanism of action of our device on the central nervous system. These studies help our research and development team as we continue to find new ways to improve upon this non-invasive migraine treatment."

Most recently, Cefaly®, the first FDA-approved external trigeminal nerve stimulation device for the prevention of frequent episodic migraines, was found to be effective among chronic migraineurs, as well as patients suffering from refractory migraines. A previous study from 2015 that used a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan and also found the Cefaly device returned normal metabolic activity to the orbitofrontal cortex and rostral cingulate areas of the brain among migraine patients.

This latest imaging study was published in the June issue of Frontiers in Neurology. The fMRI used a neuroimaging procedure to measure the brain activity in relation to changes in blood flow. The authors used trigeminal heat stimulation after 60-days of treatment with the Cefaly device. They found that Cefaly® was able to block painful stimulus in the anterior cingulate cortex, one of the regions involved in migraine attacks.

Cefaly® is a palm-sized, prescription-only, device that works through a self-adhesive electrode that's placed on the forehead and a magnetic connection, which sends tiny electrical impulses through the skin to the upper branches of the trigeminal nerve to desensitize the trigeminovascular system. The device, which is not yet covered by most insurance companies, costs $349 and comes with a 60-day money back guarantee. Cefaly® is indicated for those ages 18 and older. Women who are pregnant or could become pregnant should check with their doctor before using Cefaly®.

About CEFALY® Technology
CEFALY® Technology is a Belgium-based company, with US offices based in Wilton, Connecticut, specializing in electronics for medical applications. It has developed external cranial stimulation technology for applications in the field of neurology; in particular for treating migraines. For more information, visit http://www.Cefaly.us. Find Cefaly on Twitter: @Cefaly, Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CefalyEN, and YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/c/CEFALYTechnology

Media Contact:
Maria Coder
646-494-4773
m.coder@cefaly.us  

View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/imaging-study-expands-upon-previous-findings-that-cefaly-device-is-effective-in-blocking-migraine-pain-300493457.html

SOURCE CEFALY Technology

PR Newswire
www.prnewswire.com

Last updated on: 25/07/2017

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