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04-Feb-2019

Opioid Overdose Kills More Americans Than Car Crash

This is for the first time when Americans’ odds of dying from opioid overdose are higher than motor vehicle crash. According to an analysis done by a non-profit group, National Safety Council named Injury Facts found that the lifetime odds of dying through an accidental opioid overdose were one in 96 while looking at the odds of dying by motor vehicle crash were one in 103. This way you can see who is more harmful to Americans.

As per a statement from the NSC published on Monday, the nation’s opioid crises stimulating the Council’s grim probabilities and those crises are worsening with an influx of illicit fentanyl. The approximations used in the NSC analysis are grounded in 2017 mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) which a part of the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The opioid outbreak has paid the attention of federal and state lawmakers are looking for solutions. In the latest example of its impact, police in Chico, Calif said that one person died and more than a dozen people were hospitalized following a mass drug overdose at home, CNN reported. Authorities suspect fentanyl in that case.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse revealed that more than 49,000 people got died due to opioid overdose in 2017. Last fall, the Senate accepted legislation to fight the opioid crisis. In an interview with USA TODAY in October, Francis Collins, the director of National Institutes of Health said that they would fund perdurable treatments for people addicted to opioids, also develop non-addictive therapies for people who are dealing with pain.

In a study published by the Journals of the American Medical Association, it was revealed that almost nine thousand children and teens died from opioid poisoning between 1999 and 2016. The National Safety Council’s analysis also got to know that the odds of dying from a fall are 1 in 114, there is up from 1 in 119 a year ago. More than 169,000 preventable deaths were reported in 2017, up 5.4 % from 2016, says the council.

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Last Updated: 06-Feb-2019